Here are some steps to help, support and guide you through the key points you’ll need to do after a death. Alternatively, you can contact us straight away and we’ll advise you on what to do next, or if you prefer, we can arrange a home visit or Hospital visit– whichever is best for you. Here is After a death A step by step guidance

We’re here to help 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, contact us on 020 7018 0300. our location 

Following practical steps are needed in order to move forward with the funeral arrangements. This guide provides a brief overview of what steps need to be taken and in what order.

1. Get the Medical Certificate of Cause of Death
2. Contact the registry office for registering the death and the burial order
3. Arrange the funeral with us

EXPECTED DEATH AT HOME

Medical Certificate of Cause of Death:
If the death was expected, for example, from a terminal illness, you will need to contact the doctor who attended the deceased during their final stage or dial the NHS helpline on 111 as soon as possible.
– The doctor will issue a Medical Certificate of Cause of Death allowing you to register the death
– Contact us on 020 7018 0300 immediately to arrange removal of your loved one into our care.

Registering the Death:
You must register the death within 5 days; this includes weekends and bank holidays.
Please note that an appointment will need to be sought prior to attending the Registrar’s Office.
• A relative or friends who were present at the time of death will have to submit the Medical Certificate of Cause of Death to the Registrar of Births and Deaths at a registry office where the death has occurred.
• If available, you can take the deceased’s birth certificate, council tax bill, marriage certificate, passport, or utility bill.

The registrar will ask for your loved one’s personal details such as:
– Date and place of death
– Full name at the time of death (and/or any names previously used),
– Date and place of birth,
– Last addresses,
– Occupation,
– Full name, date of birth and occupation of a surviving or late spouse or civil partner
– Whether they (including spouse) were receiving a pension or benefits
– Informant’s name and address

• After registering the death, you will get two certificates (a Certificate for Burial, also known as the ‘Green Form’ and a Death Certificate). In addition to this, an important booklet with documents will be given and explained by the registrar.

Arrange the funeral with us:
Once you’ve completed the steps above, the Certificate for Burial (green form) should be given us to continue with the funeral arrangements.
The funeral arrangements-
– Timing of ghusl
– Finalising arrangements of Janazah prayer’s date, time and place
– Deciding on the burial place, date and time

IMPORTANT NOTE: If the GP/Doctor treating the deceased has not seen him/her after the death or within 14 days before the death, then the death will be reported to the Coroner. The paramedics may call the Police to arrange for a funeral director to collect the deceased and take the body into their care; acting on behalf of the Coroner. The Coroner will contact you as soon as they are satisfied and advise you to get a Medical Certificate of Cause of Death from the doctor.

EXPECTED DEATH IN HOSPITAL/HOSPICE/CARE HOME

Medical Certificate of Cause of Death:
If your loved one passes away in the hospital/hospice/care home, next of kin or closest family members will be informed immediately.

Many hospitals/hospice throughout the UK have Muslim Chaplain, staff specialising in bereavement supports or have ward staff that are able to explain procedures and arrange the Medical Certificate of Cause of Death. This will be issued to the family who will take this form to the local Birth and Death Registrar’s Office (in the area where the death has OCCURRED, not where the deceased lived) to acquire the Death Certificate and the Burial Certificate (known as Green Form).

The body will be kept in the hospital mortuary until you have arranged with us. For the release of the body, a green form must be obtained from the Registrar’s Office. Some hospitals have an early release policy on religious grounds. You may need to sign an authorisation form to enable us to take the deceased into our care.

The hospital will also make arrangements to ensure that the deceased’s possessions are returned to the next of kin.

Registering the Death
You must register the death within 5 days; this includes weekends and bank holidays.

Please note that an appointment will need to be sought prior to attending the Registrar’s Office.
• A relative or friends who were present at the time of death will have to submit the Medical Certificate of Cause of Death to the Registrar of Births and Deaths at a registry office where the death has occurred.
• If available, you can take the deceased’s birth certificate, council tax bill, marriage certificate, passport, or utility bill.
The registrar will ask for your loved one’s personal details such as:
– Date and place of death
– Full name at the time of death (and/or any names previously used),
– Date and place of birth,
– Last addresses,
– Occupation,
– Full name, date of birth and occupation of a surviving or late spouse or civil partner
– Whether they (including spouse) were receiving a pension or benefits
– Informant’s name and address
• After registering the death, you will get two certificates (a Certificate for Burial, also known as the ‘Green Form’ and a Death Certificate). In addition to this, an important booklet with documents will be given and explained by the registrar.

Arrange the funeral with us
Once you’ve completed the steps above, the Certificate for Burial (green form) should be given us to continue with the funeral arrangements.
The funeral arrangements-
– Arranging collection of the deceased body from the mortuary
– Timing of ghusl
– Finalising arrangements of Janazah prayer’s date, time and place
– Deciding on the burial place, date and time

UNEXPECTED DEATH

If the death is unexpected, you must call the emergency services immediately by dialling 999. The operator will provide instructions on what you need to do. The paramedics, upon arrival, will either attempt resuscitation or confirm the death.

If the cause of death is unknown, it is important for you to leave the area untouched. The Police will arrange for a funeral director to collect the deceased and take the body into their care, on behalf of the Coroner.

WHEN A DEATH IS REPORTED TO THE CORONER
A medical practitioner may report the death to a coroner if the:
– cause of death is not known
– deaths within 24 hours of admission to hospital
– death was unnatural
– person who died was not visited by a medical practitioner within 14 days before passing away or after death
– medical certificate is not available
– death occurred during an operation or before the person came out of being under anaesthetic
– person took their own life. if there are any suspicious circumstances or history of violence
– medical certificate suggests the death may have been caused by an industrial disease or industrial poisoning

The Coroner may arrange a post mortem. This is a legal requirement and does not need the consent of relatives.

The coroner may decide that the cause of death is clear. In this case, the doctor will sign a medical certificate of which you take to the registrar. They will provide you with the death and burial certificate.

IF POST MORTEM IS NEEDED
A post mortem is an examination of the deceased body taken by the coroner to determine the cause of death. This can be done either in a hospital or a public mortuary.

Although the relatives’ permission is not needed they may be represented at the post mortem examination by a doctor. If they are to be represented the Coroner will, if possible, tell the relatives the time and place of the examination.

Alternatives to a post mortem-
• To avoid the post mortem procedure due to Islamic beliefs, the alternative option to determine the cause of death can be provided through an MRI scan which needs to be requested by the family to the coroner. However it may not be sufficient for the Coroner to make a clear assessment of the cause of death. A post mortem would then be necessary.
• The cost of the MRI scan has to be met by the deceased’s family or their representative (you can contact us for more information). It will not be met by the Coroner’s Office. There would be a separate charge for this procedure which would need to be covered by the family (you can contact your funeral director for more information on this). If the coroner agrees, they will arrange an appointment with a facility where this option is available.

AFTER THE POST MORTEM
The coroner will release the body for a funeral, once they have completed the post-mortem examinations and no further actions are needed.

If the body is released with no inquest, the coroner will send a form (‘Pink Form – form 100B’) to the registrar stating the cause of death.

Inquest-
A coroner will hold an inquest if the cause of death is still unknown, or if the person passes away from a violent or unnatural death.

The death cannot be registered until after the inquest, but the coroner can give you an interim death certificate to prove the person is dead. You can use this certificate to let appropriate organisations know of the death and apply for probate. When the inquest is over, the coroner will send the information to the registrar who will then register the death.

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